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83,000 guests later, Fujifilm celebrates 1st anniversary of Wonder Photo Shop

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***Original post published on Digital Trends***

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After finding success with retro designs for its cameras, Fujifilm decided to try selling them the old fashioned way, too, with a brick-and-mortar store. After one year, it’s still standing.

There aren’t nearly as many brick and mortar camera stores as there used to be, but that hasn’t stopped Fujifilm from trying to build a noteworthy retail presence. One year ago, the company opened its first U.S.-based retail store, the Wonder Photo Shop. Located in New York’s historic Flatiron District, the store sought to ignite a “photographic renaissance” through hands-on interaction with digital and instant cameras and mobile printing. We covered the launch of that store last year, and now Fujifilm is hosting its first anniversary, representing the culmination of an apparently successful opening year in which the store hosted some 83,000 guests, according to the company.

The celebration officially begins on Saturday, July 22, and runs through Sunday, July 23. On each day, Fujifilm will give away an Instax Mini 9 instant camera every hour, but you’ll need to visit the store in person to enter to win. The Mini 9 is the latest Instax camera (although, not the line-topping model) and includes a built-in “selfie mirror” to more easily snap instant pictures of you with your friends (which, of course, is what Fujifilm is hoping you’ll do at the store should you win a camera).

New York’s Wonder Photo Shop is just one of several around the world, joined by stores in Barcelona, Spain; Bogota, Columbia; Istanbul, Turkey; Auckland, New Zealand; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; and Tokyo and Shanghai. Despite being the newest, the New York store has become Fujifilm’s flagship location. It invites guests to experience the “rebirth of the joy of photography,” as Fujifilm calls it, through product demos, classes, and exhibitions. Store employees and guest presenters conduct lectures from the store’s “DIY lounge,” and visitors can offer feedback and share their ideas, leading a two-way exchange of information that, in theory, benefits both the brand and its customers.

Fujifilm isn’t the only camera company to try its hand at a retail operation. Leica operates many stores in cities around the world and also has “Leica boutiques” which act as curated spaces dedicated to Leica products within independent retail stores. While Leica’s approach is a bit more, well, German, Fujifilm seems intent on embracing the fun side of photography. The Wonder Photo Shop even has a photo booth complete with backgrounds and props where guests can ham it up like your drunk uncle at your wedding.

The Wonder Photo Shop isn’t just a place to sell cameras, then, but also gives Fujifilm a place to carefully craft its image and gauge the market through direct interaction with customers. In addition to the Instax camera giveaways on July 22 and 23, the store is running a series of specials and promotions throughout the month. Follow the store on Instagram or, if you’re in the New York area, stop by in person at 176 Fifth Avenue.

***This post originally published on Digital Trends***

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Watch the Newest Ads on TV From Amazon, Honda, Google and More

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Every weekday, we bring you the Ad Age/iSpot Hot Spots, new TV commercials tracked by iSpot.tv, the real-time TV ad measurement company with attention and conversion analytics from more than seven million smart TVs. The ads here ran on national TV for the first time yesterday.

A few highlights: Honda promotes the advantages of a plug-in hybrid—”the end of your battery charge isn’t the end of the world”—in a commercial for the 2018 Honda Clarity. Amazon plays up the fact that its Fire TV device can integrate with its Alexa digital assistant in case you’ve got any questions you want answered while watching TV. And Google hypes “The Last Jedi” AR stickers that are available exclusively on the Google Pixel camera.

Today’s TV Ad Highlights

Premiered on: NFL Football, ESPN
Google Pixel 2 data for the last 30 days
Impressions: 1,329,230,021 (28% of industry)
Est. TV Spend: $39,531,769 (23% of industry)
Attention Score: 84.63
Attention Index: 109 (9% fewer interruptions than avg.)
Beyond the Battery
Premiered on: SportsCenter With Scott Van Pelt, ESPN
Honda data for the last 30 days
Impressions: 2,042,122,298 (6% of industry)
Est. TV Spend: $29,574,537 (5% of industry)
Attention Score: 87.73
Attention Index: 122 (22% fewer interruptions than avg.)
Last-Minute Gifting With Groupon!
Premiered on: Yukon Men, Animal Planet
Groupon data for the last 30 days
Impressions: 704,923,884 (7% of industry)
Est. TV Spend: $4,880,364 (5% of industry)
Attention Score: 93.00
Attention Index: 136 (36% fewer interruptions than avg.)
Trip to the Gym
Premiered on: A Football Life, NFL Network
Amazon Fire TV data for the last 30 days
Impressions: 332,762,860 (37% of industry)
Est. TV Spend: $6,915,689 (41% of industry)
Attention Score: 79.56
Attention Index: 75 (25% more interruptions than avg.)
Winding Down: Westworld
Premiered on: NASA’s Unexplained Files, Science Channel
Google Home Mini data for the last 30 days
Impressions: 1,354,932,485 (31% of industry)
Est. TV Spend: $34,427,008 (37% of industry)
Attention Score: 84.51
Attention Index: 71 (29% more interruptions than avg.)

Data provided by iSpot.tv, Attention and Conversion Analytics for TV Ads

TV Impressions – Total TV ad impressions delivered for the brand or spot.
Est. TV Spend – Amount spent on TV airings for the brand’s spots.
Attention Score – Measures the propensity of consumers to interrupt an ad play on TV. The higher the score, the more complete views. Actions that interrupt an ad play include changing the channel, pulling up the guide, fast-forwarding or turning off the TV.
Attention Index – Represents the Attention of a specific creative or program placement vs the average. The average is represented by a score of 100, and the total index range is from 0 through 200. For example, an attention index of 125 means that there are 25% fewer interrupted ad plays compared to the average.

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Martin Agency Taps MullenLowe's Kristen Cavallo as CEO

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Kristin Cavallo. Credit: IPG

Less than two weeks after the departure of Martin Agency Chief Creative Officer Joe Alexander, which followed an internal investigation into an allegation of sexual harassment, the Interpublic Group agency has named MullenLowe‘s Kristen Cavallo as CEO.

Cavallo, most recently U.S. chief strategy and growth officer at MullenLowe, will succeed current CEO Matt Williams, effective immediately. Whether or not Williams is leaving the company or shifting to a new role was not clear. The agency referred inquiries about Williams to Interpublic. A spokesman for the holding company said it’s in the process of working through a transition process and can’t comment furhter.

Before joining MullenLowe seven years ago, Cavallo spent 13 years at IPG sibling shop The Martin agency, where she rose through the ranks from a strategic planning director to senior VP of business development.

“This is an important moment. I want people to feel the possibilities that exist for this agency. They are talking about us, but soon I hope they are rooting for us. As a strategist, I love opportunities for transformation, and feel fortunate to play a part, with the full support of Interpublic and its leadership, to help re-write the ending of this chapter,” Cavallo said in a statement.

“Obviously, there is a need for a new direction, and the culture has to evolve,” she continued. “To be the first female CEO of this agency, in this year, under these circumstances—the weight of this isn’t lost on me. It’s going to be hard, but we can do hard things. As a mom, I want my kids to see that, and to set an example that resilience and possibility matter.”

Last Thursday, Williams and Martin Agency President Beth Riley-Kelley sent an email to staff saying that Alexander’s behavior was “inexcusable” and his exit was the agency’s decision.

In addition to outlining what the email referred to as “the basics,” such as unconscious bias training, to help keep employees within The Martin Agency safe, the note stated that the shop will put Tiny Pulse, an anonymous feedback platform, in place in January.

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Google AdWords Adds Targeting by Phone Number, Mailing Address

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Credit: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg

Google has expanded the consumer-targeting capabilities of its AdWords platform to let marketers use phone numbers and mailing addresses to reach their right people.

Previously, AdWords campaigns only allowed advertisers to upload anonymized email addresses as well as set broader targets around demographics and interests.

Google’s new targeting tools will likely be more effective than email addresses, as phone numbers and mailing addresses often prove to be more reliable, says Kevin Lee, co-founder of Didit, a full-service digital agency that specializes in search.

“This new feature allows for a higher audience match rate, particularly for marketers who either do not have email addresses for their entire customer file, or the email address that the marketer has is different than the addresses that Google has for the individual,” says Lee. “Postal mail eliminates that ambiguity and gets higher overall match rates, particularly when used in combination.”

“A higher match rate by including postal means more flexibility in scaling the campaign,” adds Lee. “This is a great way to get marketers to confidently expand their budgets on Google by creating larger customer match audiences.”

The move itself seems long overdue from Google, as targeting users using their phone number or address is commonplace in the marketing world. However, in Google’s case, the delay was likely due to high levels of scrutiny by regulators, Lee says.

There could be downsides. Google’s terms and conditions say marketers can only use their own data to create an audience to target, not use third-party data they bought elsewhere. But letting phone numbers and mailing addresses come into play could increase the temptation for direct-response marketers, for example, to go get the information they need to take advantage, Lee says.

But it’s also a pretty standard capability, according to Praneet Sharma, chief technology officer at Method Media, an audit and media consulting company. “Marketers use addresses that are captured through sweepstakes or on websites that ask the user to input phone numbers, email addresses,” Sharma says. “Many of them might share that information with a data management platform. For Google, and the amount of data they have, you could say they are exposing more user information, but again, what they’re doing is common in the industry.”

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