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Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Made a Siri Movie

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Yesterday, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson tweeted that he had teamed up with Apple “to make the biggest, coolest, sexiest, funnest (is that a word?) movie ever.” He also said the movie would drop today, and it certainly did.

Now, while The Rock may call this a movie, at under four minutes I’d call this a very well-crafted and expensive advertisement paid for by Apple. The short is called “The Rock x Siri Dominate the Day” and shows Johnson doing what he does best: on-screen action, only this time he’s relying on Siri to get him through the day.

As ads go, it’s a much more enjoyable watch than the usual content contained in such spots. It must have cost Apple millions, but then Apple has the money available to spend, and it also has the HomePod, a smart speaker that relies on Siri, launching in December. Could this spot just be the first of many Siri-focused ads in the lead-up to that launch?

It’s likely Apple will more than recoup the money this ad costs by simply selling more gadgets thanks to the PR. Johnson has a massive following, who are now more well-acquainted with Apple’s digital assistant.

The “movie” has only been on YouTube a few hours and (at time of writing) it’s already had a quarter of a million views. When America wakes up, expect that figure to quickly jump into the millions.


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6 Proven Facebook Advertising Offers You Can Use to Attract More Business

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The following excerpt is from Perry Marshall, Keith Krance and Thomas Meloche’s book Ultimate Guide to Facebook Advertising. Buy it now from Amazon | Barnes & Noble | iBooks | IndieBound

We’ve identified six proven Facebook offers that have worked across the board in multiple industries for our agency clients. Before I get into these respectively, I want to mention that they’re listed in reverse order of commitment. This means that No. one takes the least commitment while No. six takes the most.

1. Coupon, sweepstakes or blog

There are three ways you can craft these ads:

  1. Video ad to coupon. This offer is the one with the least commitment. The offer could be a coupon for a product or service, and it works wonders with local businesses.
  2. Short copy ad to coupon. You can also write a short copy ad, which can work just as well. What happens with coupon ads is that you’ll get massive organic brand exposure because people really engage with this type of ad content. They don’t just come into the store to redeem their offer, but they also share the coupon with their friends.
  3. Short copy ad to blog post. This is an ad to “ungated,” or free, blog content. Ungated just means that the visitor isn’t required to give anything in exchange for consuming the content, like their email address, their money, etc. This works very well in the short-term if you come up with the right hook, so a prospect clicks on your ad, reads your blog content and gets indoctrinated with your brand. If properly done, this can easily lead to a sale either directly or indirectly.

Related: 14 Ways to Increase Your Facebook Page Engagement

2. Checklist, swipe file or cheat sheet download

This type of ad has slightly more copy than other short copy ads, but it’s still considered short. The offer should be something that allows prospects to improve their lives or their businesses in some way. If you offer a downloadable PDF checklist for a lead magnet, you should also have a webinar registration page right that hits on some desires and pains. But, the first step, which should be a simple opt-in to get a free download, is a simple ask, so the ad and landing page copy shouldn’t be very long.

3. Quiz/survey funnel

When it comes to using a quiz or a survey funnel, the key is really to have a great curiosity-driven hooks that reels your prospects in and immediately engages them. By using a hook that leaves people wanting more, they’ll want to take the quiz or fill out the survey. Then, through a series of strategic questions, you take your prospect down a path where they’re telling you, based on their answers, what their problem is and then you can prescribe a solution to solve that problem, which in this case, is a free downloadable report. People have to opt-in to be able to get their results, and the prescription can be a free or paid product. Even if they don’t buy, you have an incredible amount of data that you can use to discover your customer avatar’s greatest fears and desires.

Related: Top Tips to Create Facebook Videos to Market Your Business (Infographic)

4. Webinar or event

Many people value their time much more than their money, so the level of commitment for a webinar or event is high — you’re essentially asking people to spend at least 90 minutes with you — so you have to pre-commit your prospects with long copy. One way I’ve successfully done this is by using a short 30-second clip with a text overlay highlighting the hook, and then elaborating a lot more in the long copy.

What’s important to know here is that each step in the ad is seeding the next. Once they read your copy, you want them to register and then show up to the webinar, but you need to deliver value throughout the ad.

5. Free plus shipping for physical products

For this particular offer, there’s a very clear distinction from the level of commitment of offers one through 4. Now you’re asking people to pull out their credit cards so the upfront value needs to be that much more.

I had a successful and long-running campaign promoting a free plus the cost of shipping offer for the second edition of one of my books. To pre-frame prospects into buying my book in the next step, I made a video where I taught them the number-one lesson learned after spending an average of $600k a month on ad spend.

Once I educated my prospects and elevated their status — because now they’re smarter and more informed because of what I just shared with them — I invite them to buy my book so they can learn even more. By delivering value in the form of content that speaks to their desires and pain points, I created a greater desire within them to meet those desires and pain points and to find a solution for them. I then offer my solution — to get a free book so they can learn more.

This type of ad works very well with cold audiences because it lowers the barrier of entry at a very minimum in order to convert your prospects to qualified buyers.

Related: The Starter Guide to Facebook Groups for Business

6. Product sales page

There’s no doubt video ads are the most powerful ad type, which is why I would encourage you to create a video that leads to your product sales page. When you’re running traffic to people who are unaware of who you are or the solution you provide, a great way to build authority, credibility and rapport is to educate them.

But, if you’re thinking about just putting up a video with a straight call to action to buy your product, don’t do it because it won’t work. There has to be a whole lot more to it than just a CTA. You have to provide them with really valuable information and offer them an easy way to solve their problems. Prospects will then naturally want to learn more because you’ve educated them so well and have elevated their status in the process, so you take them to the product sales page.

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What Can Modern Marketers Learn From Advertisers of the Past?

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I was chatting with a marketing friend the other day, and he was telling me how much he loves watching Mad Men, not just for the entertainment value, but to see how advertisers used to conduct business and the creative process Don Draper and his team used to go through for each project. Fun side note: a lot of the commercials that aired during the show were commercials from that time. It was a great show, exploring everything from changing gender roles and racial issues in the ’60s to the bold, in-your-face advertising tactics that dominated marketing at the time.

While modern digital marketing has changed drastically from tools created with adtech (check out these 10 adtech trends to keep an eye out for), programmatic, machine learning, native advertising, data-driven granular targeting and the coveted “growth hacking,” some highly effective advertising methods from the old days have remained.

Related: 10 Laws of Social Media Marketing

Fifty years ago, advertising was a one-way conversation. Without the web to provide information and context, brands were free to create their own reality and to tell customers what to think about their brands. Campaigns were written around a catchy slogan and marketing materials, packaging and media supported the manufactured brand vision.

How consumer perception has changed

Well, hold on to your fedoras Mad Men fans, because that type of branding still works. “Aspirational advertising” is today’s modern version of that in-your-face, one-way conversational advertising. Yes, it may be more subtle, but it still works by gently coaxing you to improve your class by purchasing “better” brands.

Nathan Linder, the co-founder of IDW, a modern advertising agency, explains how some things have changed, and some have remained. “Today’s digital age has disrupted every product category and marketplace. The products and services that were once commonplace, such as travel agents, have now moved to services like Expedia and Travelocity,” he says.

The changes, of course, extend to advertising. Consumers can easily research every claim, consult reviews from people they will never meet and even research the origin of ingredients from the food they consume. Increasingly, consumers are more interested in fine details: Is this product GMO, from a fair trade source, made in America?

Related: 4 Ways to Market Your Business for Free

With every aspect of their product line available for criticism, brands have to work even harder to sell their brand vision — without appearing to do so. Given the way things have changed, it is a little surprising that antiquated methods of brand reinforcement are still effective.

“In the advertising and marketing industry, some age-old tactics that continue to be worth their weight in gold include product placement and retail merchandising,” Linder says. “These tactics continue to be where the rubber meets the road for consumer packaged goods players. While TV, web, social and billboard continue to remain relevant, getting products within the ‘arm’s reach of desire’ is the moment of truth for CPG brands such as Coca-Cola and others, all who follow aspirational marketing.”

What it means for brands

Successful brands are still building successful campaigns around carefully crafted brand vision, and customers are still buying in for as long as the company and the product live up to the message. “Authenticity in marketing and advertising is when a brand lives up to all of its promises: quality, customer service, pricing, and when this happens brands win consumer loyalty,” shares Ryan Williams, founder of Industry Threadworks.

Related: Use These 5 Steps to Create a Marketing Plan

Everything about the brand must be consistent across all channels. From tweets to in-store displays, from customer service employees to employees social accounts, brands must control the message, and act quickly when the public perception is betrayed.

In the heyday of Mad Men, when hydration was more dependent on bourbon than on imported water, and customer loyalty was unshakeable, companies could convince customers of anything. All they needed was trust, and consumers were willing to give it. Advanced technology and the abuse of that trust has made today’s customer’s skeptical. Today’s companies have to work harder to earn that trust and work harder to retain it. The same traditional brand-building tactics are still in play, but have simply aged with the times.

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Implementing 2 Advanced Google AdWords Strategies

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The following excerpt is from Perry Marshall, Mike Rhodes and Bryan Todd’s book Ultimate Guide to Google AdWords. Buy it now from Amazon | Barnes & Noble | iTunes | IndieBound

Let’s explore two advanced Google AdWords campaign types: Dynamic Search Ads and Call-Only campaigns. Give these two campaign types a try. They’ll let you squeeze even more from your AdWords account.

Dynamic search ads (DSAS)

Dynamic search ads are magical keys to reaching your customers. And the best part? Using them is easy once you master the setup.

What Are DSAs?

Google knows it’s hard to keep your campaigns perfectly in sync with your website. If you have an e-commerce site with thousands of products changing regularly, it’s a chore to be constantly creating new keywords, new ad groups and new ads inside your AdWords account. DSAs were created to fill this gap. They let you show ads to excellent prospects who might be searching for items you sell on your site even if you don’t have a corresponding keyword for them in your account.

Related: 15 Useful Tech Tools for Your Business

Why should you set up a DSA?

As long as you set a low cost-per-click, dynamic search ads typically have a decent CPA and provide additional relevant traffic. They’re also great for research as you get to uncover new search terms that people are using to find your site. (You can use this intelligence after the fact to add new keywords to your account.)

Let’s say you’ve just started selling wrought-iron fire pits on your e-commerce site but you don’t have the keywords for them yet in your AdWords account. A new prospect — we’ll call her Kim — is currently online searching for this by name. Kim types it in verbatim: “wrought iron fire pits.” If you have a DSA campaign set up, you’re in luck: Google instantly recognizes that you sell these but don’t yet have keywords for the purpose. Thankfully, you don’t miss a beat with Kim — Google shows her your Dynamic ad, then she clicks, comes to your website and makes a purchase.

How do they work?

It starts with Google regularly scanning your website and keeping an index of all its pages. When you’re starting out, you can choose to point Google to your entire site — we recommend this for your first DSA campaign — although later on you can target specific categories within your site.

Google knows what keywords are in your account and, more importantly, what keywords are not there. This means they can make accurate judgments about when to step in and show your DSA ads.

Related: 25 Creative Ways to Promote Your App For Free

When setting up DSAs, Google creates the headline and you write the description. They choose the final URL and you set the bid.

Here’s how to set up a DSA:

  • Create a new campaign. One of the options you’ll see is to create a DSA campaign. We suggest not using that as it would limit your options further along. Instead, create a new Search campaign with “all features.” Your plan will be to only use DSAs inside that campaign.
  • You’ll need at least one ad group to hold your DSAs, and one is typically enough if you’re just starting out.
  • You still want to be split-testing, even though Google chooses your headline for you. So, create two different DSA ads with different body copy in each.
  • Choose the target. Start with the “all webpages” default. Save the advanced target­ing for later.
  • Add in ad extensions just as you would for a regular campaign.

Ongoing management of your DSA

Review your data. Keep an eye on the search queries Google chooses, particularly in the first few days. This lets you add any new negative keywords that you don’t want your ads shown for. And it’s a good way to identify and add new keywords you hadn’t yet thought of for other functioning campaigns. (You can add these new keywords as negatives in your DSA campaign, which forces that keyword traffic over to new campaigns in your account. Your DSA campaigns won’t be affected.)

Related: The 25 Best U.S. Cities for Tech Startups

Call-only campaigns

These allow you to create search ads where Google shows your phone number rather than a headline. As such, they only show on mobile devices capable of making calls. A person clicks on your ad, which starts the process of calling your business directly from their mobile, rather than taking them to your site.

Why use call-only?

Call-only campaigns force people to call your phone number rather than visit your site. If generating more phone calls is high priority for your business, call-only campaigns are worth testing.

How to set up call-only campaigns.

Setup is simple. You can create a new campaign from scratch or just copy your existing search campaigns and change the ad type. Replace regular ads with call-only ads.

Tip: Google wants to see individual ad groups with a reasonable number of impressions at the ad group level. So a small number of ad groups with more keywords in each one — generating more impressions per ad group — will work better for call-only campaigns.

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