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Joseph “Rev Run” Simmons Confirmed As Headline Speaker At SMWNYC

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Social Media Week is excited to announce the addition of Joseph “Rev Run” Simmons to the SMWNYC speaker lineup. The renowned musician, producer, and entrepreneur will join Matt Britton, CEO of Crowdtap, for a fireside keynote on April 24.

A founding member of the legendary hip-hop group Run DMC, Simmons also known by his stage names of Rev Run and DJ Run, and for his role as a practicing minister. He has also garnered success on the small screen, first with the popular reality series “Run’s House,” and most recently with the announcement of a new Netflix comedy. The series will star Simmons and his wife, Justine, in their first scripted family sitcom. The two also serve as executive producers.

On the heels of this momentum, Simmons joins Britton—an entrepreneur and published author and expert on youth culture and new media trends—to discuss a variety of topics including digital content, music industry trends, influencer-branded entertainment, and social media.

Britton has advised more than half of Fortune 500 companies in the space of youth marketing strategy as well as authored YouthNation, a best-selling book that presents a roadmap for brands looking to enhance their understanding and reach of their millennial audience.

The event will be held on April 24 at 1:30 p.m. at the Sheraton Hotel in Times Square.

Secure your pass today for 40% off and save $499. Fewer than 200 passes remain at this price. Offer ends Friday December 22.

Social Media Week is a global conference series that explores and celebrities the intersection of technology, media, and culture. SMWNYC is the program’s flagship event, held April 24-27, 2018 at the Sheraton Times Square.

Social Media Week is a leading news platform and worldwide conference that curates and shares the best ideas, innovations and insights into how social media and technology are changing business, society and culture around the world.

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The New York Times Chief Operating Officer Joins SMWNYC Speaker Lineup

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Social Media Week is pleased to welcome Meredith Kopit Levien, COO of The New York Times Company, as a headline speaker at SMWNYC, which runs from April 24-27, 2018. Kopit Levien was recently named one of the world’s top 50 most innovative marketing execs by Business Insider.

Kopit Levien was promoted from Chief Revenue Officer to her new role of COO earlier this year. In this role, she oversees consumer revenue and advertising surrounding the publication’s digital product, design, audience and brand, consumer revenue, advertising, live events and new product development teams.

Despite faltering revenues at many traditional and new media properties, The New York Times’ total subscription revenue grew 46% in Q3 over the same period last year.

Kopit Levien played an instrumental role in The Times’ “The Truth is Hard” campaign, which kicked off with a television ad that debuted during this year’s Oscars. The effort, created with Droga5, began with a big ask from CEO Mark Thompson, who famously asked Kopit Levien and other Times execs what they would do with a budget of $10 million.

The result was a moving commercial and cross-platform media campaign that underscored the importance of the truth and the overall role of journalism to uphold accountability and ensure full transparency to readers, a particularly prominent area of discussion following the 2016 election.

At SMWNYC, Kopit Levien will participate in an in-depth dialogue around how The Times is defying media industry trends and positioning itself as a purveyor of a truth within the so-called “fake news” era.

Secure your pass now to see Meredith Kopit Levien and other headline speakers at SMWNYC.

Social Media Week is a global conference series that explores and celebrates the intersection of technology, media, and culture. SMWNYC is the program’s flagship event, held April 24-27, 2018 at the Sheraton Times Square.

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For Tamron Hall, Empowering Women Starts With Uniting Women From All Walks of Life

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Tamron Hall, the former NBC News and Today Show anchor, who’s about to launch her new talk show, joined WHOSAY CMO Paul Kontonis at Social Media Week Chicago for the chat “Do I Have Your Attention? Fan Engagement Strategies with Tamron Hall” where the award-winning journalist talked about empowering women through social media, how she connects with and engages fans on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter and what she looks for when partnering with brands.

The award-winning journalist, whose career evolved along with social media from her early days as a new anchor in Chicago to closely covering Barack Obama’s groundbreaking campaign to become President of the United States to supporting viral causes such as the hashtag #metoo, talked about the power of social media to help people. However, there’s a caveat. “I think the outrage cannot just come when it’s rich women, white women, when it’s women who are famous,” she said.

“I think that when you have viral hashtags or stories that go viral they often go viral because there’s a celebrity attached to it,” she said. “And so, for women, I think, and as we look ahead, hopefully in the advancement of all women of all colors and all backgrounds, is that we somehow have to remind ourselves [to] not forget the girl behind us, the woman in line next.” She gave the example of “some woman right now who works for city sanitation” who is, perhaps, harassed by a male coworker. “Her name is not a famous name and the person who she is harassed by is not a famous director,” she said. “But, nonetheless, it hurts and her life and her livelihood [can suffer as a result].”

And so Tamron wants for women to use social media as a uniter, not a divider. “I just would like to see a stronger alliance between women, whether it is the woman that sits in our parish or the woman in Hollywood, whether it’s the black mom who lost her child in the South Side of Chicago or the [white] Newton mom,” she said. “I would prefer to, one day, look up and see a stage of black moms being held by a white mom, an Indian mom, an Asian mom gathered […] this is about a child who is actually losing his or her life unjustly, rather than a black child.”

“For women, I think, I’d like to see this unification. Hopefully, [social media] can be the platform because the Green Revolution happened on social media, that was a Twitter movement,” she impassionately recalled. “And so, perhaps, this movement of women can happen that would join us better […] The liberal feminist can no longer look like a white woman and the mom whose tears are flowing down her face can no longer look just like a black woman. There has to be a joining of women and I think that can happen through the power of social media. That’s what I’d like to see change, the power of social media bringing us closer together.”

Tamron embodies the kaleidoscopic nature of our times to perfection. A seasoned journalist who’s broken the most consequential stories of our generation, she also has a knack for other topics such as fashion and entertainment. “Social platforms show the layers that we are,” the self-professed “multi-layered television personality” explained.

“With Deadline Crime, because it is a crime show and it’s a tough show to watch, it’s hard to put a picture [on Instagram] and have someone ‘like’ it,” she explained, adding that for this type of content she tends to engage more on Twitter and Facebook. Tamron also said that she tends to use Instagram for things such as fashion “and this event” as the ‘gram is “livelier” and “has more color.” She then proceeded to show how good she is at nailing the social media game across types and contents and platforms by skillfully art-directing and shooting an on-stage selfie with Paul and the crowd. “This is what they call Instalife,” she joked. “We made this look better than what it was [in real life].”

Tamron, who in a previous interview confessed she’s a brand’s “dream consumer,” followed up on the way she connects with and engages brands online. “I don’t join forces with any organization [if it’s not] in line with my beliefs,” she told WHOSAY’s Kontonis. “I wanna be able to look at my social media and say, ‘this represents who I am.’”

As a consumer, Tamron knows she belongs to a generation of women who are more discerning than ever when it comes to supporting brands. “We now make more money than we ever had, we have control of our lives because other great women, our mothers, our teachers, have said, ‘you’re gonna have your time,’” she explained. “And we are rising up, politically, even though we didn’t see the first female president [yet]. We’re challenging the IT companies, the systems that have supported pay inequality and these atmospheres we talk about [that can lead to] harassment.”

She went on to explain that if a brand wants to connect with empowered female consumers they have to stand ready to share their story in a compelling manner so they can engage like-minded consumers. “We wanna know your story, what you got,” she explained. “I’ve met a lot of women entrepreneurs and on social media who are affirming what I’m saying with our dollars, which is, ‘what’s your story?’ before I give you my money.”

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

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Here’s The No. 1 Reason Why Brands Are Winning On Pinterest

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With its 200 million monthly active users, Pinterest might not have the reach of other social platforms—but the company does have a secret weapon when it comes to attracting advertiser dollars. So, why are marketers flocking to Pinterest in droves? You can credit the platform’s ability to create an ecosystem wherein brands are welcome participants.

Jason Wire, a Creative Strategist at Pinterest, explained this model at Social Media Week Chicago. In his talk, he explored how Pinterest’s product is designed to “give people what they don’t know they want,” thereby helping brands play an active role in taking people from ideas to action.

The unbranded opportunity

Wire shared that a whopping 97 percent of Pinterest searches are unbranded, which uncovers a huge whitespace for brands vying to influence consideration at the early stages of consumer interest. As people search for home decor ideas, outfit suggestions, and makeup tips, they are open to exploring content from brands with authority in these spaces.

In this sense, Pinterest has carved out a unique niche wherein marketers can capture attention at critical moments of the consumer consideration phase. As brands find creative ways to align their products to inspirational moments (ideas-based vs. product-based), they will have more success on the platform and drive consumers to an act in a way that benefits the bottom line.

How brands can drive action in Pinterest

Building on this piece, Wire reiterated that the role of the brand on Pinterest is to provide relevant and unique ideas; it’s not about repurposing basic product ads in the hopes that consumers will make the connection between the product and what they happen to be looking for. Of course, making this distinction requires a bit of creativity, which is where Wire and specialists like him within Pinterest’s Studio fit in.

In fact, Wire shared that 75 percent of the ideas shared on Pinterest originate from brands. “You have a unique opportunity to not be disruptive, but additive to somebody’s experience,” he said. He continued by emphasizing that although at the surface-level people are searching for what to cook, how to decorate, and where to travel, they are essentially looking for guidance on what to buy.Use this to your advantage.

Wire’s five best practices for brands on Pinterest

Distilling his expertise into five key takeaways for brands, Wire shared the following takeaways:

  1. Show up early: On Pinterest, people begin planning early. While holiday pins are searched the most in mid-November, research shows that people begin planning as early as June. It’s important to have your brands content online that early because studies have also shown that consumers often purchase from brands that had the first impression.
  2. Stay relevant: Relevance can mean directly aligning with topics and searches that make sense for your brand (e.g. a hair product sharing pins around easy to replicate updos) or it could mean finding a creative way into an existing conversation. An example of this concept in action is Cheetos, which asked people to upload photos if their snack resembled an object. This helped Cheetos position against popular topics like “thigh-high boots” in a humorous and engaging way.
  3. Have the look: Pinterest is, first and foremost, a visual search tool. Invest the time and resources into creating captivating content and you will increase your odds of discovery.
  4. Inspire and educate: Pinterest is not the place for cookie cutter ads. Your pin should promote your product, but should also do so in a way that adds value to the users’ life in one way or another. Make it about them; not you.
  5. Drive action: Consider what you want users to do upon seeing your content and remind them of your product’s role in their life.

Pinterest continues to build out its product, helping users turn digital search queries into actions IRL. In fact, the platform recently debuted Pin Codes, which allow brands and retailers to link inspirational tips directly to their products.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

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